FAQs

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Q: Why is the serving size 8 capsules per serving?

A: We know, 8 capsules seem like a lot, especially compared to many other prenatal supplements on the market. This is for a few important reasons: Full Circle Prenatal contains more choline, magnesium, and calcium. These are three critical nutrients needed for pregnancy and can be difficult to get enough of in the diet. In fact, did you know that Approximately 90%–95% of pregnant women consume less choline than the Adequate Intake (AI) levels?(1) Often, these three nutrients are omitted or included in very small quantities because they are large in size. Our mission in creating Full Circle Prenatal was not to compromise on the amounts, forms or quality of the nutrients we chose to include. And the good news? Full Circle Prenatal is designed to be very well-tolerated and can be taken in divided doses, or as recommended by your healthcare practitioner.

TIP: The capsules can be opened and mixed into a smoothie or cool beverage! Discuss this option with your health practitioner.

 

Q: Why doesn't Full Circle Prenatal contain iron?

A: Full Circle Prenatal does not contain iron by design. Iron needs and tolerance vary significantly by individual. Iron needs increase as a pregnancy progresses, and getting in enough iron is critical for a healthy pregnancy, however, not all women will need to supplement with iron to keep their levels in a healthy range. Additionally, it may be best to match the form and dose of iron to your specific needs. Monitor your iron status with your healthcare practitioner and if you do need supplemental iron, take it separately in appropriate doses at their recommendation. This will help avoid unnecessary digestive distress or result in consuming too much or too little iron overall. 

Q: Why do the amounts of some of the nutrients in Full Circle Prenatal exceed the percent Daily Value?

A: The levels of nutrients have been chosen based on a combination of the best available evidence, safety, and likelihood of the body being able to absorb the nutrient. Some things to consider: the percent daily values set may not align with current evidence on the amount of the nutrient needed during pregnancy either because a level has not been established, or because it is based on outdated RDA's (Recommended Dietary Allowances). Second, the amount of the nutrient that can be absorbed by an average, healthy person may be limited by normal factors affecting digestive health. For example, only about 10 mcg of a 500 mcg oral Vitamin B12 supplement is actually absorbed in healthy people (3). It is less than that is individuals with gastrointestinal diseases. Lastly, in cases where the amount of the nutrient exceeds the percent daily value, it has been shown to be safe at the level included. 

Q: Why doesn't Full Circle Prenatal contain DHA?

A: The experts behind Full Circle Prenatal believe that the stability of DHA is compromised when taken out of the context and mixed into a multivitamin. Additionally, there is a benefit to taking both DHA and EPA. So while DHA is essential for a healthy pregnancy, the experts at Full Circle Prenatal recommend that you talk to your healthcare practitioner about taking stable, high-quality fish oil or algae supplement separately and/or making sure your diet has enough omega-3 fatty acids. 

Q: Does Full Circle Prenatal contain active B vitamins?

A: Yes, the forms of B vitamins chosen for our formula were strategically chosen for their ability to be absorbed and tolerated well by anyone.  

Q: Why does Full Circle Prenatal contain 4,000 IU's of Vitamin D?

A: Vitamin D is critical for optimal fertility, fetal development and preventing pregnancy complications. A double blind, randomized clinical trial found that Vitamin D supplementation of 4,000 IU/day for pregnant women was safe and most effective in achieving sufficiency in all women and their babies regardless of race or where you live -even if living in sunnier climates! (2).

 

1. Brunst KJ, Wright RO, DiGioia K, Enlow MB, Fernandez H, Wright RJ, et al. Racial/ethnic and sociodemographic factors associated with micronutrient intakes and inadequacies among pregnant women in an urban US population. Public Health Nutr 2014;17:1960-70.

2. Hollis BW, Johnson D, Hulsey TC, Ebeling M, Wagner CL. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Double-blind, randomized clinical trial of safety and effectiveness. J Bone Miner Res. 2011;26:2341–57.

3. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/